Our Universe Visualized
Because the moon’s orbit around Earth is elliptical, its distance from Earth varies by 46,087 km (28,637 mi.); as such, the moon appears to change in size. This composite image based on Galileo photographs of the moon shows the apparent change in size of the moon when viewed at perigee (closest point from Earth; left) and apogee (furthest point from Earth; right). On the evening of May 5, 2012 at 11:34 pm EDT, the time of the full moon will nearly coincide with perigee, producing a so-called “Super Moon,” which will be noticeably brighter and larger than usual.

credit: Galileo Project, NASA

Because the moon’s orbit around Earth is elliptical, its distance from Earth varies by 46,087 km (28,637 mi.); as such, the moon appears to change in size. This composite image based on Galileo photographs of the moon shows the apparent change in size of the moon when viewed at perigee (closest point from Earth; left) and apogee (furthest point from Earth; right). On the evening of May 5, 2012 at 11:34 pm EDT, the time of the full moon will nearly coincide with perigee, producing a so-called “Super Moon,” which will be noticeably brighter and larger than usual.

credit: Galileo Project, NASA

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